In Transition …

If you’re trying to find our rescue website — ApsoRescueColorado.org — please be advised that we’re in transition and will have the new site up shortly.  Until then, you’ll most likely get a sign-in page for WordPress.com.

If you need to reach rescue, please contact me directly at ApsoRescue@aol.com.  Otherwise, we’ll just have to wait for our very capable Webmistress Michelle to get us on the ‘Net again.

A Rare Thing …

… indeed!  And that would be a Lhasa Apso taking Best in Show at Crufts by a breeder/owner/handler.  Elizabeth and her breeder/owner/handler, Margaret Anderson, defeated 21,000+ other dogs at the world’s largest dog show to claim the title.  Just a beautiful, beautiful Apso and a veteran at 7 years of age.  Congrats to all involved!

Elizabeth and owner, Margaret Anderson

Another one home …

After two+ months in rescue, our little Emmy went to her new home recently.  We just love repeat adoptions and this one is no exception.  Trudi and Paul — who adopted Ka Tu, the little guy with the fracture jaw — opened their hearts and home for Emmy.  I have no doubt that this home will more than make up for all she’s been through.   From a starving little waif to this …

Trudi & Emmy
Trudi & Emmy

… a new family which includes canine and feline siblings.  Here’s an excerpt from Trudi’s update on how things are going …

I would say things are going great!! The first few days, Vickie, I was really concerned about her. She just seemed so melancholy and listless. Hardly responded to anything. Always a chow hound tho! which I took to be a good sign. Didn’t care about taking walks. Didn’t want to go down the deck stairs. When I carried her down and told her to potty, she looked up at me like how dare I set her in this nasty, wet grass. I was worried about her, her eyes were so blank. I think when I talked to you the first morning she had played with Tu some, running around the table? Well, even that subsided. OK – that was the first two days.

Now, oh my gawd! She’s home!!! I think she felt like she was in yet another orphanage at first. Vickie, this little gal is now the life of the household! She and Tu tear thru the house chasing and panting. I think she may end up being the alpha. The other day I threw one of the toys and Toots got to it first. Emmy runs up and bites him in the butt! Toots quit playing after that but they were back at it again yesterday evening and this morning and he’s holding his own. I’m on vacation now for a week so it will be good to really keep them both close. When I came home Sunday evening, Emmy met me with the star in her mouth and she and Tuie both danced around! It warmed my heart! Tu has a “donut” on the couch (I think it’s in his photos I left with you) and now Em is in it half the time. We’ll have to get another one – pink, of course!

Emmy has had only one accident and that was the second day. I caught her in the act, which was good. Now she goes down the deck all day long. If Tu goes, she goes. Tuie has a seeing eye hole in the fence (knot hole) just his eye level. That’s how he keeps all the riff-raff disciplined. Em is right with him. She holds her tail up all the time; has a prance to her step and a sparkle in her eyes! She even barked yesterday when the doorbell rang. She loves to sit in Paul’s lap and get long belly rubs. She no longer cries at night – not a peep. And I know Tu wakes her with his snoring! Not much different than their “human room mates!”

We are so thankful for our adoptive homes … partners in rescue, we couldn’t continue our work without them. 

Misery from Kansas …

In early August, I was contacted about a stray in Wichita, Kansas.  A three-year old female in bad shape, to be exact.  “Emmy” had wandered up to an office building where one of the workers (Marilyn) took pity on her and attempted to find her home.  Her “owner” — and I use that in the lightest of terms — was located whereupon she promptly advised that she didn’t want the dog, didn’t want it to begin with (it was given to her), and she wasn’t taking the dog back.  She did, however, keep her long enough to sell the litter of puppies Emmy had recently whelped … and then went on to state she didn’t have money to take care of the dog.    

Matted coatMarilyn took poor Emmy to a groomer to see what could be done with the horribly matted coat.  A complete shave was in order, taking the coat off in a pelt.  Based on her condition, it was  highly doubtful she had been ever groomed.  Pretty bad when one realizes that Emmy is three-years old.  Amazingly, she had few skin issues and no fleas.  Oftentimes, severe matting will actually pull chunks of skin out as well as setting the dog up for bacterial skin infections by holding moisture to the skin.   Once the coat came off, it was painfully apparent that Emmy had been on low rations for some time … her bones jutting out from all angles.  Nursing her pups had taken every bit of reserve she had and then some without sufficient or proper nutrition.    

Marilyn contacted me and we began the mad scramble to get Emmy to Colorado on the next C.A.R.E. transport, just days away.  She had to have current vaccinations and a health certificate to be accepted onto the transport.  Arrangements were made to get her vetted, a health certificate issued, and then to the pick-up place and on the van.  Thankfully, Marilyn was quite close and able to accomplish it all with a minimum of trouble.     

Via phone calls and email, we were advised the C.A.R.E. transport vans would be pulling into the Petco in east Aurora around 7:30 p.m.  Unlike the late evening when when we picked Bubba up, the north parking lot was full of people and vehicles, awaiting their new charges.  Some are rescue organizations, others are adoptive families there to pick up dogs coming from other rescues.  I later find out that, on this particular evening, 41 dogs are coming in on two vans … 41 chances for a new life in the West.  Grayhounds, Cockers, Weinie Boogers, Mastiff, Catahoula, assorted Terriers, Labs, Pyrs … it’s like a rainbow of dogdom.    

Emmy
Emmy …

One of the biggest surprises of the evening was pulling up and finding my vet, Doc Sherry, waiting there as well to pull four dogs off the transport … two adults and two puppies.  I’ve used her as my vet for going on a decade now and we have a great working relationship.  Sherry and I stand chatting until the vans arrive; she says she wants to look at Emmy before we head back to Loveland.  Once I get Emmy off the van, gather her paperwork and have a chance to really go over her, I’m appalled at what I find.  She is, literally, starving to death.  With a grassy area close by, we make a potty run as I’m sure it had been quite a while since the last relief stop.  Sherry, who has her dogs watered, pottied and loaded, swings by our vehicle.  She, too, is disturbed by Emmy’s emaciated condition.  Her eyes are infected and we’re hoping that she hasn’t developed dry eye as well.  During the exam, Sherry bends down and whispers in Emmy’s ear, “I’m so glad you are going home with Vickie.”  

Stay tuned for Part II …

Elwood update …

As you can see by the pictures, he has adjusted very well to our family, and as much as he loves his brothers, he loves his tennis ball even more – Ha!

We can’t get over how smart Elwood is – he has learned so quickly as to what he is or is not allowed to do. 

As you can probably tell by the pictures, his hair is finally getting longer and that means he will need to be groomed in a few more weeks.  He loves to be brushed, so don’t think grooming him is going to be a problem.  Needless to say, we love this little guy!  DeLores and Lou

 
 
Elwood & Piccalo
Fav toy ...
Elwood, Piccalo & DaVinci

99 Things …

While most of the items on this list are pretty much “common sense,” it never hurts to have a refresher course on what items our animals should be avoiding …

A printable (and probably more readable) copy can be found at this .pdf file … … 99 Things Harmful to Pets.

The disappearing website …

… well, it was there.  “It” being our local rescue site, ApsoRescueColorado.org.  Seems Microsoft is no longer offering free hosting for non-profits. We didn’t get the email that was sent out notifying us of the change … and the new charges … so it has disappeared into cyberspace.  Fortunately, our very capable webmistress, Michelle, has tracked it down and will be researching the options (read that “cheap options”) for continuing our domain name and lining up hosting for the site.

Stay tuned as we wander our way back from the black hole of cyberspace with a new and updated rescue site.  In the meantime, we’ll keep the Blog advised of  our progress and rescue activities.  We’re still here — just not easy to find!

UPDATE:   We’re still looking for a low-cost hosting service … if you have any questions about our policies/procedures or need forms, please contact me directly at:  ApsoRescue@aol.com.

Tibetiya …

One of my favorite songs from Tibetiya by Oliver Shanti and Friends. 

Close your eyes and imagine, if you will, a monastary set high in the Himalayan mountains where Apsos and Tibetan monks walk the corridors, moving as one.

Mamers …

a/k/a as Mae-Mae — our little foster from a Missouri puppymill — got a new home for the holidays!  Here’s Mae-Mae and her new mom, Jami …

I hear that Mae-Mae is quite spoiled and has declared herself “Queen of the Couch.”  The new home came with a loyal subject in the form of a cat, Zsa Zsa, that took to the dog like a duck to water.  A little birdie also told me that Mae-Mae’s new grandpa has threatened to dognap her … just because she’s so darned sweet!

The little red dog …

The little red dog ... Mae-Mae
The little red dog ... Mae-Mae

… is an absolute joy.  And the resilience and adaptability of the canine never ceases to amaze me.  Mae-Mae — our little puppy mill survivor — has been here five weeks now.  Other than watching her a little more closely to monitor her house training, you’d think she’s been here forever.  Nothing short of astounding as she lived her entire life in a puppy mill.  Many of the mill dogs are fearful, having had little human contact, and their adjustment can take months or even years.  Some never get over the trauma.

Mae-Mae sleeps through the night in her crate.  She toilets appropriately having decided the grass is more “user friendly” than the concrete or stone patios.  She knows what “outside, go potty” means .. and will do exactly that … walk outside into the grass and go potty.  She dances for her food bowl and will take a treat from my hand.  She delights in being petted and will seek out this attention.  She is comfortable being picked up as she no longer splays her front legs out, stiff as a board and as wide as they’ll spread.  My Apsos are not lap dogs per se; however Mae-Mae definitely is and a favorite evening pasttime entails curling up next to me on the couch.  She probably thinks she’s died and gone to heaven.  In her five weeks here, she’s taught herself — with little input from me — to walk nicely on a leash.

Her greatest joy, I believe, is having the freedom to run in the yard.  Zoom, zoom … there she goes with a happy grin on her face.  Sometimes she just sits and suns herself, contented to soak up the warming rays.  I would surmise that her former surroundings were rather dark and dismal.

Sugar doesn’t come any sweeter than this little red dog …

Kalsang …

Kalsang
Kalsang

Kalsang (“Kehl-sang” … Tibetan meaning “good fortune”) is an 8- to 10-year old Lhasa Apso who came to us from the county humane society. He was found urine-soaked and matted to the skin. He had extreme ear infections and an eye infection. The HS, who believed he was about 5 years old, cleaned him up, shaved him to the skin and began medical treatment. After their assessment, they believed he was just too sweet of a dog to wait out a new home there so they contacted our organization.

The first week in foster care was just plain sad. Kalsang didn’t move, had no reactions to anything; paid no attention to his foster home mates. He cried when he walked and cried when he slept. He was a dog with no soul. 

By the end of the first week we had him evaluated at our own vet. It was confirmed that he was older than the humane society believed him to be. Although his ear infections were cleared up, we began treating his eye infection and arthritis.

In just a few short days, a new dog began to emerge. First, with his pain under control, he was able to sleep comfortably all night in his crate. Small moments of play were noticed, either with a toy, a nylabone or with his foster home mates. It was brief, but signs of life began to show.   Now — several weeks later — his eye infection is cleared up, he’s on daily OTC meds to control his arthritic pain and his activity level has increased exponentially.

Kalsang is house trained and sleeps in a crate at night. Because of his age, his activity level is low and most likely will always be; a true couch potato. He will find a toy to carry around or chew a nylabone for awhile.  He also enjoys a Kong with filling to pass his time.  Kalsang is a good eater and loves his treats. He gets along with other small, low activity-type dogs and cats. He has shown interest in investigating his yard and surroundings, but never goes too far.

This senior would make a great companion for someone who matches his activity level. Kalsang is very loving and greets everyone as though he’s always known them.  Kalsang certainly deserves ‘good fortune’ for the rest of his life and a loving home to see to this old boy’s simple needs.  While technically a “senior,” he has many good years left … it is not uncommon for Apsos to live 15-17 happy, healthy years

Somebody needs their bangs cut ...
Somebody needs their bangs cut ...

UPDATE!!  Kalsang has literally bloomed in foster care.  He’s got more energy, is playing with toys and the other dogs.  Just a couple days ago, he emptied the toybox.  Not sure what he was looking for but he was a dawg on a mission.  Yesterday, he was at the fence — barking at the goats.  I’m sure he was telling them that was his yard and they weren’t welcome.   Like fine wine, this old boy just keeps getting better and better.  A true gentleman, he’d make an excellent companion for someone not interested in daily walks … a few cruises a day around the backyard  is sufficient.

 

Rally to Rescue!!

Okay folks … here’s an easy way to support rescue!  Click on the link and then the header that says, “Vote for Your Favorite Rescue Story.”  Then scroll down, find “Buddy” and cast your vote!  Helen Brown, the national rescue coordinator for the American Lhasa Apso Club, is doing the introduction during the video. 
 
 
Come on and get behind your breed!

Mushroom warning …

We’ve all seen them, those little white ‘shrooms that pop up overnight in one’s yard.  However, if you have dogs, you may want to watch those little ones a little more closely …

Mushrooms found in yard kill family dog

 
One day she was playing with her dog in the yard and the next, the dog was dying and doctors say it’s because little Shiloh ate something that could be in your own backyard. It was wild mushrooms and unfortunately, Shiloh died a few days later. Now the pet’s owner wants to make sure others are aware of what can happen.“It was hard, she was mostly my buddy.” Tami Mungenast has pictures all over her house of Shiloh – a one-year-old, 90-pound Great Pyrenees. It only took one wild mushroom to kill her.“I never thought there’d be a deadly mushroom in my front yard.” Shiloh ate one of the mushrooms last month and four days later, she died.“She slipped into a coma and liver shut down.” Tami was desperate to find out what killed Shiloh so it doesn’t happen to her brother. “I’m neurotic about it right now.” Everyday she combs her yard looking for mushrooms.Shiloh’s vet says there’s no way to tell for sure exactly what mushrooms the dog ate but after having the dog’s liver tested, they found these mushrooms had a toxin called Galerina in them. It can kill anyone who eats it, like Shiloh did. “In about 24 hours her liver started to shut down and within three days, there was nothing you could do.”
 
Dr. Carolyn Orr says they see four to five dogs a year that have eaten wild mushrooms but Shiloh’s case was the most severe. That’s why her owner is making sure it doesn’t happen again. “Every day I scope the property and then in afternoon and just remove them. There’s nothing I can do to get rid of them.”Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and foaming at the mouth and usually these happen eight hours or so after the dog has eaten the mushroom.Shiloh’s vet says the best thing to do once you see your dog have these symptoms is get them to the vet. 

And again from headlines …  

Dog dies after eating toxic mushrooms in yard

08:49 PM EDT on Tuesday, September 30, 2008

By TONY BURBECK / NewsChannel 36
E-mail Tony: TBurbeck@WCNC.com
   

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Toxic mushrooms have killed at least one dog in the Charlotte area and have made several others ill, according to local veterinarians.

The recent soaking rains are to blame for mushrooms popping up around town.

Tiffany Salomon told NewsChannel 36 that her dog died of mushroom toxicity. She has three dogs — Alex, a Bichon; Riley, a Yorkshire terrier; and Gino, a Shih Tzu.

Salomon says the dogs are her family.

“I dress them up in clothes, give them baths. They’re just like children to me,” Salomon said.

All three dogs loved to play in the yard. But recent rains caused mushrooms to pop up.

“We never thought these things would be toxic,” Salomon said.

Some mushrooms are toxic. Gino ate one.

“They think it’s a toy and want to chew on it and play,” Salomon said.

Suddenly, happy healthy Gino was fighting for his life. It started with vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Mushroom toxicity attacked his liver, according to the veterinarian’s report.

“We tried everything we could. We did blood transfusions. It didn’t work. He was just bleeding too much,” Salomon said. “He was too ill and had taken too many in. His body was literally shutting down.”

Gino died.

“It’s like losing your family member,” she said.

Alex, the Bichon, was next. He, too, had bloody diarrhea. His diagnosis: suspected mushroom toxicity.

The veterinarian thinks Alex ate a kind of mushroom that doesn’t shut the liver down. Alex lived.

Gino and Alex’s vet says instead of trying to figure out which mushrooms in your yard are toxic or bringing the mushrooms to animal hospitals, your best bet is picking them and throwing them away. Eliminating the threat could be saving a life.

Coming to a Town Near You …

The following is an article by Cindy Cooke as published on the UKC site (United Kennel Club).  If you think this can’t happen in your city, you’re wrong … dead wrong.  Pay particular attention to the ordeal an ethical/responsible breeder (and rescuer) was subjected to and how the City of Littleton, Colorado basically held a gun to his head, including forcing property inspections outside the City’s jurisdiction!!

 United Kennel Club: This Means War, by Cindy Cooke

 

Simple pet owners need to pay attention … your rights as an owner are at stake as well.  Debby Rothman, a long-time Apso breeder/exhibitor replied with the following:

Vickie, you are absolutely right! Everyone needs to pay attention!  I know Bob. Bob is someone like me. Long time breeder. Long time exhibitor. And, unlike me, a long rescuer of all Setters. He is a responsible, ethical, compassionate breeder. There is lots of literature available on the hijacking of our rights, including our rights as dog owners. Our personal rights are being hijacked in the name of ’safety for our country’. Our rights as dog owners are being hijacked in the name of …well, you tell me. These rights have slowly, stragically been eroded by animal extremists. For example, Boulder was the first city in the country to change verbage in city laws from pet owner to pet guardian. Guardian implies animals have rights.
 
Animal welfare is one thing. Animal rights is entirely different. There are organizations that support animal welfare. Make sure your support, your contributions are going to organizations that represent your views. PETA and HSUS are dog owners two biggest enemies in our country. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Humane Society of the United States. The names sound grand. After all, what kind of person isn’t for the ethical treatment of animals. What kind of person doesn’t support being humane to animals. Both of those organizations have slowly, ever so slowly, eroded people’s rights with their dogs. Cindy Cooke does not exaggerate in her excellent article. Pay heed!
 

UPDATE:  This just in from the Center for Consumer Freedom … PETA’s Pet Death Toll Grows.  Excerpt from the article …

“… Here’s what the report shows. Not including the animals PETA spayed and neutered, the group had possession of 1,997 dogs, cats, and other “companion animals” in 2007. And PETA — which professes a belief that animals should never be slaughtered for food, used for medical research, or killed for clothing, nonetheless put 90.9 percent of them to death at its Norfolk, VA headquarters. And despite its official status as a “humane society” and a pet “releasing agency” in Virginia, PETA found adoptive homes for only 17 animals all year. Just 17.”

 
 

Something New …

You’ll notice something new with the Blog … actually, that would be “hear” something new.  We’ve added a playlist to our Sonific widget.  If you scroll down a tad, that’s the little music player on the right … a “widget.”  It shows the album cover, the song playing at the moment and has controls for play, stop, volume and advance.  If you don’t like the song currently playing, click on the button with the arrows and see what comes up next.  Or you can simply stop the player. 

Most of the selections chosen are instrumentals, bringing to mind an age long past when the Apso freely roamed its native land of Tibet.  Perhaps you will see the mists swirling low in the mountain passes as they ride the winds of change.  Then, again, you may find just a hint of Santana …  😉

Update:  Hmmph … wouldn’t ya know it.  We just get it all set up and then Sonific leaves the ‘Net as of May 1, 2008.  So what you hear is … nothing!

Treat Me Like a Dog …

“Furbaby” … the word sends chills up my spine.  While we love our four-legged companions dearly, we must never lose sight of the fact our canine companions are a species unto themselves.  Many of the surrenders we get into rescue are there because the owners lovingly, yet mistakenly, anthropomorphize (attribute human form or personality to things not human) these cute little dogs, not realizing that the Apso is one of the most dominant dogs in a small package.  Give them an inch and they will take a mile … you can bet on it!

Jan Warren, active in Dalmatians since 1988, was a guest columnist in the December AKC Gazette.  She is an AKC judge and has served as an officer, committee chair, and show chair for several kennel clubs, including the Dalmatian Club of America.  She has graciously given permission for reprint of her column submission …

Treat Me Like a Dog

At a recent show, I was dumbstruck by the sight of a girl walking a Chihuahua fully attired in a flowered sundress with matching bonnet.  While many folks saw the embodiment of cute, I was appalled.  In my opinion, this dog didn’t look cute — just plain foolish.

Unfortunately, this notion of turning our dogs into furry people appears to be growing out of control.  We see them sporting the latest fashions, pushed in strollers, and slung in totes.  Day care, therapists, and even pet psychics are available.  Dogs are not people!  Yes, we do have some traits in common.  However, a trait or two does not a human make, and when we expect our dogs to act accordingly, we set them up for failure.

Dogs are thinking, emotional beings but not in the same ways we are.  Their lives are governed by instincts with which we cannot reason.  While we strive to provide them with the best of nutrition, they are still predators born to the chase.  We should not be surprised when they go for a cat, squirrel, or even another little dog that crosses their path.  We should not be offended when our intact male dogs makes eye contact and bristles at another boy.  It doesn’t necessarily mean they have a poor temperament or are aggressive.  They are males with the male need to defend their territory against a possible sexual interloper.  We can train and socialize our dogs to the best of our abilities but, in the long run, genes will win out.

Yes, I believe in training and socialization.  We cannot allow our dogs to mark their territories in our homes, bark incessantly, or run loose, terrorizing the neighborhood.  However, training should be tempered with the understanding that in certain circumstances, nature will take precedence.  Anyone who has had an intact male dog living with a female in season knows no amount of reasoning will calm his need to breed.  You either live with the howling, slobbering, barking and panting — or temporarily relocate one of the parties.  Telling him “next time” or “not this girl” will not appease him.

Dogs are unique in the animal world.  No other creature has ever been designated “man’s best friend.”  There’s something special in the makeup of a dog that has earned him this one-of-a-kind title.  It is his joie de vivre, his unconditional love, his unswerving loyalty?  Yes, yes, and yes.  Dogs are all these things and more, because their joy, love and loyalty are not contaminated by human traits of bitterness, vindictiveness and betrayal.  By attempting to remake them in our image, we are demeaning the very character of the dog.

Think of it this way:  How exciting and fascinating is it to be able to develop such an intimate relationship with an entirely different species?  Let’s celebrate those differences and try to look for the good, savor the moment, be content with what we have, and who we are.  In this way, maybe we can both, as species, become a bit better than we would be without each other.     ~~ J.W.

Rescue Me …

RESCUE ME    (~Terri Onorato)  

Rescue me not only with your hands but with your heart as well. I will respond to you.

Rescue me not out of pity but out of love.  I will love you back.

Rescue me not with self-righteousness but with compassion.  I will learn what you teach.

Rescue me not because of my past but because of my future.  I will relax and enjoy.

Rescue me not simply to save me but to give me a new life.  I will appreciate your gift.

Rescue me not only with a firm hand but with tolerance and patience.  I will please you.

Rescue me not only because of who I am but who I’m to become.  I will grow and mature.

Rescue me not to revere yourself to others but because you want me.  I will never let you down.

Rescue me not with a hidden agenda but with a desire to teach me to trust.  I will be loyal and true.

Rescue me not to be chained or to fight but to be your companion.  I will stand by your side.

Rescue me not to replace one you’ve lost but to sooth your spirit.  I will cherish you.

Rescue me not to be your pet but to be your friend.  I will give you unconditional love.

Rescue me with true love in your heart and I will give you these things all the days of my life.