Night Tigers …


Bet you’re wondering what fits that definition.  And I’ll bet you’ve probably had one (or more) in your area whether suburban or rural.  While you may not be aware of their presence, they are definitely aware of you and what’s wandering around in your yard at dusk, midnight and dawn.

The Night Tiger … also known as  the Great Horned Owl … is common and the second most widely distributed owl in the Americas.  With its six-foot wingspread, it is capable of hunting and carrying off a great variety of animals including porcupines, dogs and cats.  In some areas of the country, dogs and cats are used as a readily convenient food source.owlperched

Hubby found owl pellets in our yard about a month ago … a sobering find as we had two small foster Tzus in residence at the time.  Weighing in eight and nine pounds, they are prime prey for the winged predators in our neighborhood.  Both owls and hawks have been spotted flying low over the yards; last year a hawk family was fledged in a neighbor’s trees.

For more information, please tune into this YouTube video prepared by East Mountain Pet Alert in New Mexico and friend and artist, Katy Widger

Birds of Prey Attack Small Pets

Be safe, be aware!  And keep those small pets under your direct supervision.

 

2 Replies to “Night Tigers …”

  1. Thank you, Vickie, for mentioning the Pet Alert youtube video on Pets and Predators! We sure do need to get the word out! Folks just don’t realize how vulnerable their little dogs and cats are to owls, all over the US. We, too, have had them “visit” our place and kill chickens. They are bold and fearless. I have been aware of them for over ten years and keep a close watch on my little Apsos.

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